THE GRIFFON BRUXELLOIS CLUB   no comments

Posted at 5:22 am in Uncategorized

is always pleased to provide information on the Breed

This particular Griffon Bruxellois is one of the most well-known in the world. Sometimes, you’ll see breeding enthusiasts talking about them on this kasinopelit.

Details of books which are available – the most definitive book on the Griffon was written by Miss Marjorie Cousens and published in 1960 but sadly this has been out of print for some years   although copies can sometimes be found at Shows or Car Boot sales.  In recent years there has been a book published by another well known breeder, the late Mrs. Doone Raynham,  which contains a lot of helpful tips and nice photographs – for information on availability please contact the Secretary.

Helpful advice on trimming your Griffon – the Griffon Bruxellois Club produces a booklet which gives advice and helpful tips on keeping your rough Griffon looking smart and trim.  Originally for the non-exhibitors who wanted to keep their pets looking well ordered nonetheless the information contained is useful as a basic guide for the new exhibitor.  These are available at Club events or by post from the Secretary.

Tips on Writing Critiques – this booklet contains helpful tips for aspirant judges on writing critiques.

Exploring the Standard – here an attempt is made to extend the breed standard with helpful tips and comments from experienced Championship Show Judges.

Application for membership forms  – applications for membership of the Club are welcomed from anyone who has the interests of our delightful breed at heart; an  application form may be obtained from the Secretary.   All applications must be Proposed and Seconded by members of the Club;  these will then be placed before the Committee at the next meeting and the result of the application will be notified as soon after as possible. Two copies of the Club’s Code of Ethics will be provided and one signed copy should be returned to the Secretary with the form. A membership fee is payable.

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Judges Lists – in line with the Kennel Club requirements all Judges Lists are reviewed annually by a Committee of long established Championship Show Judges.   Copies are despatched to all Championship Show and Open Show Secretaries but are also published in the Club Bulletin annually together with the criteria for placement on the Lists.

Written by admin on November 11th, 2010

CHAMPIONS MADE UP IN 2002   no comments

Posted at 8:02 pm in Uncategorized

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Mrs S Burr & Mr D Davies’s

Ch. Marquant Wil Smith

Mrs. B. Newitt’s

Ch. Polcot Portia

Mrs. D. Barney’s

Ch. Tuttlebees Fascinating To Cilleine

Mr. D Guy’s

Ch. Donzeata Royal Heritage

**Mrs. M-A Mercer’s

Ch. Fennymore Ultra Cute

Written by admin on March 1st, 2007

Benefits of Membership   no comments

Posted at 11:13 am in Uncategorized

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The Griffon Bruxellois Club is the oldest active Club for the breed in the world.  Its intention has always been to promote the ownership and breeding of good quality Griffons.  Membership is drawn from breeders, exhibitors and non-exhibiting owners. Club membership extends worldwide.

Each year the Club holds a Championship Show, an Open Show and a Garden Party.  These events are open to members and non-members alike and the Club actively supports the breed by -

holding Educational Events   at least one per year, including those arising from Kennel Club requirements, Supporting Open Shows with classes for Griffons where first time Judges have been appointed from our Lists (14 approached in 1999),   running the Rescue scheme for Griffons operated by an expert in the breed, maintaining a presence at Crufts annually at the Club Stand – a meeting point for many overseas members,offering Merchandise on the Club Stall including items exclusive to GBC at all events, running a Health Committee - in line with Kennel Club requirements,maintaining Archives, publishing Judges Lists,

Membership Benefits:

In addition to this members of the Club receive the Bulletin (3 editions per year) and are entitled to the Club’s Cups and Trophies (which date back over 50 years).  They also receive silver spoons when making up a Champion, and are entitled to wear the badge and to receive the Points Cups.   Members also celebrate their “Golden Oldies” with Rosettes presented by the Club.

Our club is always looking for fellow Griffon owners. If you want to chat with some of us ahead of time, you can do so while playing online roulette.

Contact: Hon.Secretary Mrs. Maria Oliver – email address (case sensitive)

                                griffonbrux.club1897@btinternet.com

Written by admin on June 7th, 2006

The Griffon Bruxellois Club   no comments

Posted at 12:50 am in Uncategorized

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The Griffon Bruxellois Club

DATES FOR YOUR DIARIES

Educational Events - Dates and venues to be advised

========

CHAMPIONSHIP SHOW

Date:  Saturday 12 April 2003

Venue: Haddenham Village Hall, Haddenham, Bucks/Oxon Borders

Judge:  Mr Stephen Bardwell (Stewell)

========

GARDEN PARTY

Date:  SATURDAY 12th July 2003

Venue:
Worplesdon Memorial Hall, Perry Hill, Worplesdon, Nr. Guildford

========

OPEN SHOW

Date: Saturday 18th October 2003

Venue:  Haddenham Village Hall, Haddenham, Bucks/Oxon Borders

Judges:  Mr Jan Den Otter (Leo Belgicus)  (Dogs)
Miss J Kearney (Jemerald) (Bitches)

========

JOINT EVENT
The Griffon Bruxellois Club and the Northern Griffon Bruxelloid Club

Date: 22nd November 2003

Venue:  Rencroft Centre, Stotfold, Hitchin

Programme for the day to be finalised but may contain items on

Trimming the Griffon, Showing your Griffon to advantage,
Assessments, Stewarding etc. Details from the secretaries – Mr. G. Lee 0121 743 1996
or Mrs. M. Oliver 020 8660 0969

========

CLUB HANDBOOK

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Now in course of preparation – closing date for copy/photographs 1st August 2003

Details Miss M Swinge e-mail balthazar@tinyonline.co.uk
or the Secretary email birchend@btopenworld.com

Written by admin on August 7th, 2005

Early History of the Griffon Bruxellois Club   no comments

Posted at 1:43 pm in Uncategorized

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In the Our Dogs of  20th February 1897, under “Toy Dog Talk” there was notice of a proposed Meeting to be held on 22 February at the house of  Mr. Howard Spicer (later Sir Howard Handley Spicer) to discuss the formation of a Club for the Brussels Griffon Fanciers.   A report of the meeting appeared later on 27 February and this was pronounced a success – “the Club will start with good prospects of making itself useful to those interested in the little red Belgium dogs”.

At a meeting on March 6 1897 of the Griffon Bruxellois Club (England) there were noted to be fifteen members of the Club.  Registration by the Kennel Club followed in 1898 but the first separate Club Show was not held until 1913.  Championship status was granted in 1924.  Miss A. Gordon became the first Hon. Secretary and she held the post from 1897 to 1905. There is a continuous record of Hon. Secretaries right up to the present.  The Count and Countess Henri of Bylandt became  the first Patrons of the Club.  Mrs. Harcourt Clare was shown as President in 1897 but there are no records showing who the Presidents were in the years between 1897 to 1930.  Mrs. Pepper became President in 1930 and continued until 1939.  The first recorded  Chairman was Major Reynell in 1931.  Prior to that the Chairman was appointed for each meeting.

Two of the main contributors to the success of the Griffon Bruxellois Club and the Breed itself,  following the second World War,  were Miss Marjorie Cousens (Seagry) and Mrs. Eileen Street (Skibbereen).  They  started in the 1930′s and in the case of Mrs. Street continued into  the early 1990′s.  Mrs. Street served variously as Treasurer, President and Chairman.   Miss Cousens was Hon. Secretary and also served as Chairman.  Her principal contribution however was to write the Foyles Handbook (1960) entitled Griffons Bruxellois and to analyse and list the Breed lines in the Second Book of the Griffon Bruxellois  which was  published after her death. Copies of both of these publications are very rare indeed.

There are a number of Aussies that really enjoy Griffons as well; we’ll talk about them in the chat rooms at Aussie online pokies from time to time.

In 1954 the Club introduced a magazine for its members.  Miss Forward (Enavant) was the first Editor.   One interesting name mentioned as a Committee member, is that of Miss B. Gorringe who joined the Committee in 1953 and who is still serving today, she was Club President from 1990 to 1993. The magazine was published quarterly then three times a year and this has  continued right up to the present.  A complete set is held in the Club Archives. Although activity was curtailed the Club continued to work during the two world wars (breeding was forbidden in the first world war, and although not forbidden there was little breeding in the second war)

The Club has a fine record of supporting the breed with shows, events and encouraging breeders for over a century but it does not intend to rest on its laurels and is firmly committed to going forward into the 21st Century promoting this charming breed – the Griffon Bruxellois.

Written by admin on December 9th, 2004

JUDGING LISTS FOR 2003   no comments

Posted at 11:34 pm in Uncategorized

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THE GRIFFON BRUXELLOIS CLUB
(Founded 1897)

JUDGING LISTS FOR 2003

 The Judging Lists Sub-Committee of the above Club have considered ways to help our Judges on the “B “ and “C” Lists, to gain experience and appointments, particularly where just a few more classes or dogs would elevate them to a higher List, also to help Societies to gain better entries.  Listed below are one or two suggestions.

v      We have expanded the information normally given on our Lists to include the other breeds which the Judges are connected with.

v      Upon request to the Secretary, a Club Rosette for Best of Breed will be available when a Judge is selected from our “B” and “C” Lists.

v      If your Society would like to give the Secretary the date of Show, close of entry date, classes provided (remembering that “C” List Judges can only do three classes) and the name of the Judge selected as soon as these are known, where possible notice will be placed in the Club Bulletin (which is published three times a year).

v      If you would care to send one or two schedules as soon as they are printed to the Secretary, she will endeavour to pass on relevant information to exhibitors in the area.

v      If you advise that the Show is advertised in the Dog Press information can be passed to the Breed Correspondents for inclusion in their notes (the Editors of the dog papers will not include any information in the notes if there is no advertisement from the Society).

 

If you have any suggestions which you feel might help your entries etc. please contact me.

 

Maria Oliver, (Hon. Secretary) Tel:020 8660 0969

e-mail: birchend@btopenworld.com

website: www.griffonclub1897.co.uk

‘B’ List – Specialist

This list contains Judges approved by the Club but is not necessarily an entire list of Judges for the Breed

NAME OF JUDGE LOCATION TELEPHONE NO .               OTHEROPEN             BREEDSCHAMPIONSHIP
Mrs. C. Alcock Coventry 02476 769532 Bolognese,Havanese,Poodles Bichon
Mrs. D.Barney W.Mids 01922 447330 4 Brds in Gundog Grp (Spans)
Mrs. S. Burr Gwent 01495 718343
Mrs. K.Burt W.Mids 01564 778286
Mr. C.Gullon Nth.Yorks 01677 425243 Pugs,Min Pins,Paps,Affens,Jap Chins,Cockers, Am.C, Field,Clumber,Brittany
Mrs.A.Harkus Surrey 01342 832291 Cockers
Mrs.J.Jolley Beds 01234 854367 Pekes,Min Pins, Chis Jap.Chins,S.Chis
Miss J.Kearney Sussex 01903 506435
Mr. Jan Den Otter Holland +31.765.219.852
Mr. L. Price Gwent
Miss M. Swinge Essex 020 8220 5886 Otter Hnds,Rotts,Pugs
Mr. I.Thompson Co.Antrim N.I 0574 273103 CKCS, all Toys

“B” List – Non-Specialist

This list contains Judges approved by the Club but is not necessarily an entire list of Judges for the Breed.  These large dogs are beautiful representatives of the canine family. If you want to get your own, win big at a casino that accepts Neteller Australia.
In line with Kennel Club recommendations this list also contains Judges who have previously been approved to Judge the Toy Group (19 breeds) at General Championship Shows (MARKED WITH *) but who do not award CCs in Griffons

NAME LOCATION TELEPHONE NO.                        OTHER BREEDSOPEN                            CHAMPIONSHIP
*Mr. G. Baxter Fife 01383 724368
*Mrs. V.Blore Liverpool 0151 525 6470
*Mr.Brampton Hants 02380 485673
*Mr. G. Corish Preston 01772 612939
*Mrs.N.Davison Lancs 01253 824368
*Mr.M.Freeman Notts 01623 747006
*Miss J.Lanning Hants 01794 388507
*Mrs.R.Morgan Chester 01244 660512
*Mrs.A.Oliver Bristol
*Mr.J.Simpson N.Yorks 01977 662533
*Mrs.M.Spavin W.Mids 0121 782 2639
*Mrs.B.Taylor Peterborough 01733 240234

 

“C” List – Specialist

This List contains aspirant Judges who have shown an interest in the breed and have the support of the Club

NAME LOCATION TELEPHONE NO.

OTHER

OPEN

BREEDSCHAMPIONSHIP
Mr. M.Bevan Glos 01549 833352 Labs, GSPs It. Spin
Mr. J. Bleeker Holland +31.765.219.852
Mrs.M.Buchanan Ayrshire 01294 461741
Mr. C. Cray Bath 01761 434550 W.Grp/Pastoral, Boxers
Rev. A.Fairchild Sussex 01444 232285 Shih Tzu,Chis Maltese
Mrs.J.Harris W-S-Mare 019934 812560 Boxers
Mr.S.Harrison Liverpool 0151 284 2781 Boxers
Mrs.J.Littmoden Cambs 01945 65661 Phar.Hnds, Dachs
Mrs. J.Martyn Hants 01794 388958
Mrs.B.Newitt W.Mids 0121 743 1996 All Poodles
Mrs.C.Ritchie Hants 01256 764810 Yorkies,Chis
Rev. S. Rose Doncaster 01709 867761
Mr. J.Swinge Essex 020 8220 5886 Rotts Otter Hnds
Mrs. Wheeler Surrey 019323 51312

 

“C” List – Non Specialist

NAME LOCATION TELEPHONE NO.

OTHER

OPEN

BREEDSCHAMPIONSHIP
Mrs. G.J.Lilley W.Sussex 01403 822222 Tib.Spans,CKCS, Shih Tzu, Tib.Terr, L.Apsos,KCS, Shar Pei
Mr.S.Plane Durham 0191 5822200 Scotties,Skipperkes
Mrs. A.Teasdale Surrey 01932 847679 AVWork.,Pastoral,Toys,Grps, AVNSC.Rare Breeds & Imp Reg. O & Ch. level Beardies, Affenpinschers

Written by admin on June 4th, 2002

SYRINGOMYELIA IN THE GRIFFON BRUXELLOIS (1)   no comments

Posted at 7:21 am in Uncategorized

Maria  (GBC Health Co-ordinator) 

At the end of 2007 cases of Syringomyelia were reported in the Griffon Bruxellois.  The GBC organised a Symposium and  in March 2008, the Club held a very successful event where Dr. Clare Rusbridge, was the principal speaker on Syringomyelia.  Dr. Rusbridge is a Specialist in Veterinary Neurology, and although concerned in the research into Syringomyelia in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, she gave a lecture on the condition with particular reference to the Griffon Bruxellois.

The event was attended by representatives from other breeds who were able to bring their experience to bear for the benefit of Griffons.

It is clear that this condition has been affecting Griffons for some time.  Several people attending the Symposium confirmed that their dogs had been diagnosed, one as long as six years ago when the dog was 10 yrs old.  Although this is anecdotal evidence, we can deduce that SM is not a new condition in our Breed and one which has probably been mis-diagnosed by some of the Veterinary profession.

In part this is understandable as symptoms are very varied. An early sign is that the dog is hypersensitive in the neck area, with an uncontrollable urge to scratch at its neck and shoulders although not making contact with these areas.  It may be that the dog finds it difficult to lower its head to drink and eat and is more comfortable if food  is placed at a higher level.  The neck becomes stiff and slightly bent leading some to diagnose disc problems.

Currently the most reliable method of diagnosing the condition is by MRI scanning, and requires either an anaesthetic or sedation. Dr. Rusbridge reported that worldwide MRI scanning on 55 Griffons (all over two and half years old) had shown approximately 50% clear and 50% having SM.  The true incidence of SM in the breed in this country is far from clear but  Dr. Rusbridge was aware that of 5 scans so far carried out, three were shown as having SM and two were clear.  In her opinion the top 10 most popular stud dogs should be studied since they have the most genetic influence.   Ideally brood bitches should also be scanned. SM was not easily detected in young puppies as symptoms usually do not become evident before the age of 6 months. A list assembled by the CKCS Club of centres where low cost MRI scans are carried out is available from the Club.

Research is ongoing into finding possible DNA markers so that a blood test could replace MRI scanning as Dr. David Sargan (Canine Geneticist) our second speaker on the day, advised. Dr. Sargan is a Senior Lecturer in Molecular Pathology in the Dept. of Vet. Medicine, at the University of Cambridge.    He said that a genetic test recognising a mutant gene does not mean that you cannot breed from the animal concerned.  A carrier with good traits can be mated to a non carrier.  Unfortunately SM may be a genetically complex disease, there is no easy answer and there is a long way to go.

Dr. Sargan’s input on the day confirmed to many of us that Genetics is not an easy subject!  A number of attendees said although it was way above their heads, it was absolutely fascinating.

The aim at Steventon was to raise awareness of this unpleasant condition and encourage informed debate.  It will prove to be an important step in helping to combat SM in all Griffons.

The GBC Committee is actively considering the way ahead in the light of the Symposium.

SYRINGOMYELIA (2)

Following on from the foregoingmembers attending the AGM, were in agreement with the Committee that the Club should support Dr. Clare Rusbridge in her research into Syringomyelia in Griffons. By donating to the Syringomyelia (DNA) Research Fund, the sum of £2,500 to be ring-fenced for research predominantly in this country, we are certain that the breed as a whole will benefit.

Although at the Symposium a number of members indicated that they would prefer to support research in this country rather than in America, it may be at some stage a small amount will be channelled to the research project ***at the University of Georgia – if it was felt that a small injection of cash would hasten the results. But rest assured that the funds will be mainly for UK work.

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I am very pleased to be able to quote the following letter:-

Syringomyelia DNA Research

“Clare and I would like to thank you for the magnificent donation raised by the Griffon Bruxellois Club for our continuing research into the genetic causes of Chiari-Like Malformation and Syringomyelia.  We can assure you that this money will be used specifically for CM/SM research in Griffons in the UK.  Most importantly, we also appreciate the confidence and trust that you put on us in making this extremely generous financial support.

We look forward to working with the Club and will keep breeders apprised of all aspects of our investigations as appropriate.  If there is anything you think might help in any way, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.”

Best wishes,

signed

Penny Knowler and Clare Rusbridge, MRCVS

Mrs. Knowler has a Griffon worldwide database with about 950 dogs spanning 12-15 generations with about 60 MRI confirmed dogs at the moment.

***Referring to the University of Georgia’s research project, they now have up and running their newsletter site and the link is:-

http://www.vet.uga.edu/hospital/smallanimal/neurology/syringomyelia.php

A useful and very informative sight is the Cavalier Club one at

http://www.cavalierhealth.net/syringomyelia.htm

It is very gratifying to know that as a result of information gained from our Symposium and mention in our Bulletins, breeds other than Cavaliers and Griffons are researching Syringomyelia; in fact quite a number of dogs with “vague” but after the event, recognisable symptoms of SM, have been MRI’d and in some cases treatment has helped to alleviate suffering.

 

Written by admin on November 15th, 2001

Report of the Meeting to discuss proposed BVA KC Syringomyelia MRI screening scheme held on 24th October at British Veterinary Association, 7 Mansfield Street, London, W1G 9NQ   no comments

Posted at 5:31 am in Uncategorized

Attendees

Sandra Webber, BVA

Dr Clare Rusbridge, Stone Lion Veterinary Centre (Chairman) Dr Ruth Dennis, Animal Health Trust

Dr Luisa De Risio, Animal Health Trust

Prof Nick Jeffery, Cambridge University

Prof Mike Herrtage, Cambridge University

Dr Geoff Skerritt, Chestergates Referral

Dr Jeff Sampson, Kennel Club

Background and aims of the meeting

Syringomyelia (SM) has been recognized as a serious problem in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) and also occurs in other toy breeds. MRI screening for the condition has been established during the last two –three years in a number of centres within the UK but there is a recognized need for a standardized protocol. It ishoped that an official scheme would eventually be endorsed by the BVA and hopefully the Kennel Club. Endorsement by these official bodies would mean that the scheme could be a requirement of the Accredited Breeder Scheme for the CKCS. Thismeeting was proposed to lay the foundations for such a scheme

It is anticipated that the results from this scheme will be used in a computer modelling system pioneered for the CKCS at the Animal Health Trust. This system is designed to facilitate selection against disease while controlling inbreeding and loss of diversity and is dependent on accurate phenotypic measurements,including those derived from MRI scans.

The basis of the original database was information collected by Penny Knowler and Clare Rusbridge on clinical observations for SMand Chiari-like malformation (CM) on around 1,400 dogs of which ~ 700 had MRI scan results. The researchers, Dr Sarah Blott and Dr Tom Lewis, also have full access to the UK Kennel Club pedigree records for CKCS. Early estimates of the heritability of SM suggest it is around 0.7-0.8 orthat 70-80% of the variation between individuals is genetic in origin and about20-30% is environmental. The heritability is sufficiently high that geneticselection against the disease should be very successful.

Heritabilities for CM, cerebellar herniation and ‘medullary kinking’ are also very high.

Genetic correlations between these traits and SM are positive and less than one. This suggests that different genes may be controlling the expression ofSM and CM and that it will be possible to select against SM even if dogs have CM.

The computer model can also take account of other inherited disease, such as mitral valve dysplasia, and generates an Estimated Breeding Values (EBV) for each dog. An EBV is the best measure available for complex traits of the genetic potential of individuals. EBVs can be calculated for most CKCS even if they have not been MRI scanned, as long as they are related to dogs that have been scanned. The predicted EBV of an individual is half the EBV of its sire plus half the EBV of its dam. All dogs will have an EBV at birth but the EBV may be modified by the dog’s subsequentclinical record or MRI scan and by information coming from other relatives. The EBV becomes more accurate as information on offspring becomes available, because we start to gain insight into which half of the sire and dam genes were actually inherited when we see transmission of the genes to offspring. The accuracy of the EBV increases with numbers of offspring and thismay take some time to achieve.

There is also a large collaborative study to identify and characterize the gene(s) responsible for CM / SM in the CKCS and Griffon Bruxellois breeds. The lead investigator is Dr. Zoha Kibar from the CHU Sainte Justine Hospital atthe University of Montreal with coinvestigators Drs Guy Rouleau, and Marie-Pierre Dube, from the University of Montreal, Dr Clare Rusbridge, and Penny Knowler, from the Stone Lion Veterinary Centre in London, UK, and Dr. Sarah Blott from the Animal Health Trust, UK. This team brings together significant expertise in the clinical and biological aspects of CM and associated SM, as well as in genetics and statistical analysisof complex traits.

A genealogy of more than 10600 related CKCS dogs spanning 24 generations from over 700 MRI confirmed dogs was constructed and DNA collection of over 1500 samples was established. A whole-genome scan in 173 CKCSdogs selected based on SM-affected status and familial relationship was completed. Geneticanalysis identified six genomic regions that could harbor the CM/SM gene(s). Investigation ofthese regions by additional genetic studies in a larger sample size is ongoing. In addition a new whole genome scan using the innovative canine SNP (or single nucleotide polymorphisms) genotyping technology is being conducted. The candidate genetic interval(s) identified inboth genome scans will be further narrowed down using genetic studies in the CKCS and other related breeds affected with CM. Once the candidate genomic region(s) has been well defined, the positional candidate gene approach will be used to identify the defectivegene(s) in CM/SM. The expected outcome of the study is to identify the gene(s) responsible for CM/SM and allow the development of a genetic test to identify carriers. These studies will also help better understand the underlying molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms for better diagnosis, prognosis and clinical management of CM and associated SM.

Proposed BVA KC Syringomyelia MRI screening scheme SUMMARY

Members of Panel

Members of the panel must be board certified in neurology or radiology and have the capacity to read DICOM images i.e.have E Film ™ or similar Certification

Breeders will receive a YES / NO answer on whetherthe dog has central canal dilatation or syringomyelia

If the dog has a syringomyelia then certificate will also detail the maximum transverse width of the syrinx on a T1W image cranial to the C4-5 disc space Imaging

The minimum required images are

1) Sagittal T1W from intra thalamic adhesion to as far caudal as possible – The images must include a mid sagittal section of spinal cord visible in one section from the cisterna magna to the C4/C5 intervertebral disc space.

If this cannot be achieved because the dog has scoliosis secondary to syringomyelia then a dorsal image of the spinal cord must be included.

2) Sagittal T2W as above

3) T1W Transverse images though the maximum width of the syrinx if there is SM or as a block centred on C2/C3 and extending fromat least mid point of the vertebral body of C2 and reaching the mid point of the vertebral body of C3 Identification of dogs and labeling of images

Dogs presented for scanning must have permanent identification in the form of microchip / tattoo and Kennel Club Registration number

The microchip / tattoo and the Kennel Club Registration number together with the name, sex, breed and date of birth should be incorporated onto the DICOM images.

Age of dogs

The wording of the certificate will clearly state that this is the MRI status of the dog at the current time and that the situation may change

The minimum screening age is 12 months

It is also recommended that breeders determine the MRI status of their breeding stock at 2-3 years and again when 6 years ofage. This will provide further information about that individual dog’s estimated breeding value EBV (and therefore the EBV of that individual dog’s offspring)

Proposed Procedure

DICOM files on a CD are submitted together withthe appropriate documentation to the BVA BVA will check documentation and DICOM imagesbefore sending on to 2 members of the panel.

Those 2 panel members will reach a consensus decision – if they disagree then the images will be referred to the arbitrator.

Results are submitted to the BVA

Certificate is issued to the owner

Results are submitted to the Kennel Club and can be accessed by appropriate individuals e.g. Canine Genetics Unit at the Animal Health Trust Appeals will be submitted to the arbitrator of the panel Procedure for non-diagnostic images

An image is designated non-diagnostic by a consensus opinion from the 2 panel members.

In the case of conflict (i.e. one panel memberconsiders acceptable and the other not) then the arbitrator will makethe final decision

If images are non-diagnostic then the veterinarian concerned will be informed in writing as to why the images are unacceptable,together with constructive advice for improving them.

Inclusion of breeds other than CKCS

This scheme is not breed specific i.e. any breeder may participate providing the dog has permanent identification in the form of tattoo or microchip.

Inclusion of dogs from other countries

This scheme is also not limited to the UKi.e. images and appropriate documentation may also be submitted from other countries

Dogs scanned before the scheme comes into effect

Breeders are encouraged to submit result certificates for SM and mitral valve dysplasia, together with the Kennel Club registered name and number of the dog or a 5-generation pedigree to Dr Sarah Blott, CKCS Health Breeding Programme, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU. PDF copies of the certificates can also be sent to sarah.blott@aht.org.uk

It is likely that it will be many months before an official scheme can be started. This is because of the lengthy consultation and preparation process that is involved.

Prior to the scheme coming into effect it is recommend that from January 2009 1) The approved protocols for imaging are followed – thiswill include permanent identification of dogs withmicrochip or tattoo

2) That the images are reviewed by a boardcertified radiologist or neurologist.

Proposed BVA KC Syringomyelia MRI screening scheme DETAILED CHAIRMAN’S REPORT

Members of Panel

Members of the panel must

• be board certified in neurology or radiology

• have the capacity to read DICOM images i.e. have E Film ™ or similar Proposed founding members of the panel are to be Dr Clare Rusbridge, Dr Ruth Dennis, Dr Luisa De Risio, Prof Nick Jeffery, Prof Mike Herrtage and Dr Geoff Skerritt. It is proposed that the initial arbitrator for panel disagreements be Prof Mike Herrtage as he is familiar with the low field MR images.

It is envisaged that the panel will be expanded and/ or members rotate as the scheme expands.

Other appropriately qualified neurologists and radiologists will be invited to express an interest in joining the panel.

Certification

Breeders will receive a YES / NO answer on whether the dog has 1)  Central canal dilatation – defined as visible dilatation of the central canal that is less than 2mm wide on a transverse MRI image

2)  Syringomyelia – defined as a fluid filled cavity that includesor is distinct from the central canal that has a maximal width of 2mm or greater on a transverse MRI image

A fluid filled cavity less than 2mm that is distinct from the central canal is also defined as syringomyelia

If the dog has a syringomyelia then certificate will also detail the maximum transverse width of the syrinx on a T1W image cranial to the C4-5 disc space Other information e.g. ventricular size (measured as width of lateral ventricles relative to brain width at the level of the pituitary gland) and, cerebellar herniation (CM), material within the tympanic bullae may be recorded as part of prospective studies but this information would not constitute part of the certification because a direct relation / relevance to syringomyelia has not been proved.

MRI

Imaging

Protocol for imaging – Appendix 1

Protocol settings for Esaote machines – Appendix 2 The minimum required images are

1) Sagittal T1W from interthalamic adhesion to as far caudal as possible – images will be deemed non-diagnostic if the CNSfrom the cisterna magna to C4/C5 intervertebral disc space is not continuously visible in a single sagittal image.

The exception to this is if the dog hasscoliosis in which instance a dorsal plane image of the spinal cord containing the entire cisterna magna – C4/C5 spinal cord must be included. Dogs with scoliosis as a consequence of SM typically have a wide syrinx. If this is not the case the presence of scoliosis may be questioned and the images rejected.

2) Sagittal T2W as above

3) T1W Transverse images though the maximum width of the syrinx if there is SM or as a block centred on C2/C3 and extending fromat least mid point of the vertebral body of C2 and reaching at least as far caudally as the mid point of the vertebral body of C3

(NB it is realised that for MRI machines > 1 Tesla that T2W are preferred for best appreciating fluid –filled cavities however the majority of centres in the UK imaging for SM screening purposes are currently using low field machines. In the low field machines the T1W images are more accurate for measuring purposes and therefore for the purposes of standardisation it was agreed that measurements would be made from T1W transverse images

Additional images, e.g. transverse images to assess ventricular size and tympanic bullae, may be performed by some centres however theywill not be a requirement for certification If the imaging is not of the whole spinal column(e.g. upper cervical region only) then wording on the certificate will reflect this and state that this does not exclude more severe change elsewhere in the spine.

Identification of dogs and labeling of images

To be incorporated on the scheme then the dog must have permanent identification in the form of a microchip or tattoo

As microchips interfere with MRI scanning theymust not be placed in the cranial cervical area – correct placement is between the scapulae The veterinary surgeon that is MRI scanning the dog will sign a form to confirm that they have verified the microchip or tattoo number and that it corresponds to the given pedigree name

The microchip / tattoo and the Kennel Club Registration number together with the name, sex, breed and date of birth should be incorporated onto the DICOM images. Failure to include this information will result in rejection of the images.As this information cannot be entered retrospectively it is essential that it be done correctly at the time of scanning.

If the dog is not Kennel Club registered then the Veterinary Surgeon obtaining the MRI scan should declare that the dog is ‘unregistered’. The dog must still be identified with a microchip and tattoo

Instruction of how to enter information in the fields so that they appear on the subsequent DICOM images may be required especiallyfor the early ESOATE machines.

Age of dogs

SM is a late onset disease and initial analysis of the available SM data suggests that the risk of having the pathology peaks at age 6-7 years

The wording of the certificate will clearly state that this is the MRI status of the dog at the current time and that the situation may change

The minimum screening age is 12 months

It is recommended that the dog is screened again when 6 years of age. This would be to provide information primarily about the risk of SM and the estimated breeding value (EBV) in offspring and relatives

It is also recognized / recommended that breeders screen the dogs at an in-between age, e.g. 2-3 years, to gain further information about that individual dog’s EBV because 1)  A dog that is clear of SMat 12 months old will not necessarily remain so and the estimated breeding value will reflect this i.e.a dog that is clear of SM at 3 years of age is likely to have a better EBV than a dog that is clear at 12 months 2)  6 years old is above the normal breeding age of most bitches Consideration is been given to having a certificate that will lapse after a period of time e.g.

after 2 to 3 years

Phenotypic information

No phenotypical information (other than breed, sex and age) will be collected although individual centres may collect that information with owner consent for their own clinical records.

Proposed Procedure

DICOM files on a CD are submitted together withthe appropriate documentation to the BVA BVA will check documentation and DICOM imagesbefore sending on to 2 members of the panel. They will verify that the DICOM images can be opened and contain pertinent information and that the Kennel Club number corresponds to the pedigree name on the certificate

Those 2 panel members will reach a consensus decision – if they disagree then the images will be referred to the arbitrator.

Results are submitted to the BVA

Certificate is issued to the owner

Results are submitted to the Kennel Club and can be accessed by appropriate individuals e.g. Canine Genetics Unit at the Animal Health Trust Appeals will be submitted to the arbitrator of the panel Procedure for non-diagnostic images

An image is designated non-diagnostic by a consensus opinion from the 2 panel members.

In the case of conflict (i.e. one panel memberconsiders acceptable and the other not) then the arbitrator will makethe final decision

If images are non-diagnostic then the veterinarian concerned will be informed in writing as to why the images are unacceptable,together with constructive advice for improving them.

Veterinary surgeons who submitimages will ideally have attended a training course. If an individual is regularly submitting non-diagnostic images, then they will be invited to attend a training session before they are allowed to continue submitting images to the scheme.

Inclusion of breeds other than CKCS

This scheme is not breed specific i.e. any breeder may participate providing the dog has a permanent identification in the form of tattoo or microchip.

Inclusion of dogs from other countries

This scheme is also not limited to the UKi.e. images and appropriate documentation may also be submitted from other countries

Dogs MRI scanned before the scheme comes into effect Breeders are encouraged to submit result certificates for SM and mitral valve dysplasia, together with the Kennel Club registered name and number of the dog or a 5-generation pedigree to Dr Sarah Blott, CKCS Health Breeding Programme, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7UU. PDF copies of the certificates can also be sent to sarah.blott@aht.org.uk

However there is concern over the validity of the data. Re-evaluation of all previous certification and DICOM images is too big a task so all previously issued certificates will be accepted. However for the purposes of the EBV database only those certificates signed by a board certified radiologist orneurologist will be regarded as accurate. For all other certificates, if the information is pivotal, then it should be possible to make a courteous request that the DICOM information be forwarded to and reviewed by a board certified radiologist or neurologist.

It is likely that it will be many months before an official scheme can be started. This is because of the lengthy consultation and preparation process that is involved.

Prior to the scheme coming into effect it is recommended that from January 2009 1)  The approved protocols for imaging are followed – this will include permanent identification of dogs withmicrochip or tattoo

2)  That the images are reviewed by a board certified radiologist or neurologist.

Next steps

1)  There is a meeting between the Kennel Club and the BVA to discuss the health schemes on 25th November 2008. Information from this meeting will be presented / discussed at that venue

2)  The scheme must be selffinancing and a business plan detailing costs such as IT, distribution of results, generation ofcertificates etc must be produced.

3)  Other appropriately qualified neurologists and radiologists will be forwarded a copy of this report and be invited to express an interest in joining the panel in the future.

4)  A Seminar day for training vets who wish to provide an MRI service acquiring images for the scheme will be organized.Appendix 4 details the veterinary practices known to be interested in or currently MRI scanning CKCS for SM – All will also be sent a copy of this report so that they are kept appraised of the current situation.

5)  Prof Nick Jeffery proposed that part ofthe long term aims of this scheme should be analysis of the results to ensure thatthe scheme is actually achieving its objectives i.e. reducing the incidence of SM. These results must be published in a peer reviewed journal – i.e. not exist merely as a Kennel Club report. The AHT Canine Genetics Unit will be contacted todiscuss this objective. It is understood that a long term plan of the computer program is to model different breeding strategies to identify the most appropriate approach and that ultimately when the underlying genes for SM and CM have been identified then genomic breeding values (geBVs) for SM can be developed.

Make sure that you play with and cuddle your griffon regularly! It will make both of you feel great! So will playing online roulette games.

Other related business

DNA

There is no diagnostic test for SM available based on DNA. DNA collected is mostly for research purposes and typically in the form of buccal swabs, toe nail clippings or blood remaining from that taken for diagnostic testing.

One of the difficulties in the study to characterize the gene(s) responsible for SM is the paucity of normal dogs. This is because most dogs over 5 years of age have an MRI as part of a neurological work up and have clinical signs. Therefore if such “SM – clear” dogs are identified as part of the screening process then the veterinarian / breeder is encouraged to submit an appropriate DNA sample (as above) tothe CHU Sainte Justine Hospital at the University of Montreal

Breeders are being encouraged to donate a DNA sample from buccal swab samples. This is with the aim that once DNA markers have been identified then the donated samples can be screened for their disease genotypes. This will aid in the moreprecise estimation of breeding values.

It is proposed that buccal swab packs and instructions are supplied to practices performing MRI scans to enable sampling when appropriate and with owner consent Appendix 1 – Protocol for imaging.

Dogs presented for scanning must have permanent identification in the form of microchip / tattoo

The minimum age of a dog for submission under the Scheme is one year. There is no upper age limit

The following documents must be made available at the time of MRI scanning (i) The Kennel Club (KC) Registration Certificate of the dog if it is registered with the KC, (ii) Any related transfer orchange of name certificate (iii) Certificates relating to microchip / tattoo (iii) Prior to MRI, the owner must complete and sign the first section of the certificate (the Owner’s Declaration) verifying that the details given in that section relate to the dog being submitted, that the details are correct and granting permission for the results to be used in the ways specified

(iv) the veterinary surgeon must complete and sign the Veterinary Surgeon’s declaration that they have verified the microchip or tattoo number The microchip / tattoo and the Kennel Club Registration number together with the name, sex, breed and date of birth should be incorporated onto the DICOM images.

Positioning of the dogs may vary with the scanner / veterinarian but the head should be in extension.

It is important that the dog be positioned so that the neck is straight The minimum required images are

1) Sagittal T1W from intra thalamic adhesion to as far caudal as possible – The images must include a mid sagittal section of spinal cord visible in one section from the cisterna magna to the C4/C5 intervertebral disc space.

If this cannot be achieved because the dog has scoliosis secondary to syringomyelia then a dorsal image of the spinal cord must be included. Dogs with scoliosis as a consequence of SM typically have a wide syrinx. If this is not the case the presence of scoliosis may be questioned and the images rejected.

2) Sagittal T2W as above

3) T1W Transverse images though the maximum width of the syrinx if there is SM or as a block centred on C2/C3 and extending fromat least mid point of the vertebral body of C2 and reaching the mid point of the vertebral body of C3 Optional extras

Additional images e.g. transverse images to assess ventricular size and tympanic bullae may be performed by some centres however they will not be a requirement for certification.

If performed these transverse imagesshould be centred so that one slice is perpendicular to the lateral ventricle and passes through the pituitary and another passes through the centre of the tympanic bullae. It is acceptable that these images be transverse localiser images (i.e.

taking ~ 30second) on the ESAOTE machines (see Appendix 2) Appendix 2 -   Protocol settings for VET MR ESAOTE machines Image from ~ level of the thalamus / corpus callosum to as far caudal as possible.

A transverse localiser is done after the initial scout. 29 seconds ET 18, rep time 340, slices 9, num ac 1, reading and encoding FOV 200, sample nr 192, phases 128, hamming none, slices 9, thickness 8.0, gap 1.8. This allows you to plan the sagittal shots centring on the dorsal spines of the vertebrae . Then the following sequences are done 1) T1 sagittal – these parameters are set up to give a short FOV and therefore greater contrast.

ET 26, Rep time 530 Slices 10, Num Aq 4 Reading FOV 170, encoding FOV 170, Sample # 320, phases 232, Hamming filter low, thickness 4.5, gap 0.4 2) Turbo spin echo (like T2W) sagittal

ET80 rep time 2800, slices 10, num acq 2,reading FIV 200 encoding FOV 200, sample # 256, phases 192, hamming filternon, thickness 4.5, gap 0.4.

3) T1W 3D transverse centring on the C2/C3 disc space or the widest part of the syrinx ET 16, flip angle 65, rep time 38, n acq 1,reading and encoding FOV 180, 3D 80 sample # 256 3D phases 40, hamming none, aniso3d (checked), 3d thick 9.1.

The first 2 sequences are ~ 10 minuites long, The 3rd sequence is ~ 4 minutes so the whole process should take ~ 30 minutes.

Optional extra

Additional (quick ~ 30second) transverse localiser images through lateral ventricles at level of the pituitary gland and also through and tympanic bullae – this is so an assessment can be made of ventricular size / symmetry and whether there is material in the middle ear.

This information is not currently important for grading but is being analysed prospectively Appendix 3  Criteria scored by panel members

Presence or Absence of Syringomyelia– syringomyelia defined as a fluid filled cavity that includes or is distinct from the central canal that is 2mm wide or greater on a transverse MRI image

A fluid filled cavity less than 2mm that is distinct from the central canal is also defined as syringomyelia

If syringomyelia is presence then the maximum width is measured froma transverse image Presence or absence of central canal dilatation – central canal dilation is defined as a dilatation of the central canal that is less than 2mm wide on a transverse MRI image Other parameters may be recorded as part ofongoing research into the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. These are still to be decided upon but may include.

1.  Length of visible syringomyelia (must also record length of spinal cord imaged).

2.  Ventricular ratio – the maximum width of the lateral ventricles divided by the maximum width of the forebrain taken from a transverse section made at the level of the pituitary gland

3.  Ventricular asymmetry

4.  Chiari malformation – Consideration will have to be given as to whether to include information on CM for other breeds as this malformation is less common than in the CKCS and in the case of the Griffon Bruxellois has a significant association with syringomyelia

5.  Material within right / left / both tympanic bullae 6.  Measurements from cervical vertebral canal

Appendix 4   Centres currently offering or interested in (reduced cost) scanning (unlikely to be exhaustive list and does not include all Universities and AHT)

UK

The cost is generally around £200 – £300 inclusive of VAT per dog. For most centres this includes the cost of interpretation and providing the certificate. Some centres offer a discount for more than one dog.  Some centres scan the head & cervical region under sedation, some others use anaesthesia.

Dr Geoff Skerritt

Chester Gates Referral Hospital

Telford Court

Chester Gate

Chester CH1 6LT.

Tel: 01244 853823

Email: SKERRVET@aol.com

Prof Nick Jeffery

University of Cambridge, Department of

Veterinary Medicine

Maddingley Road

Cambridge,CB3 OES

Tel: (Main Reception) 01223 337621

Email: ndj1000@cam.ac.uk

Dr Clare Rusbridge

Stone Lion Veterinary Centre,

41 High Street,

Wimbledon Common,

London SW19 5AU

Tel: 020 8946 4228

Email: neuro.vet@btinternet.com

Mr A. Sim

Heathlands Veterinary Hospital Ltd.

Winfrith,

Dorchester,

Dorset, DT2 8DD

Tel: 01929 462535

Mr Andrew Robinson

Dovecote Veterinary Hospital

5 Delven Lane

Castle Donington

Derbyshire, DE74 2LJ.

Tel: 01332 810395.

Email:

alisonrobinson@dovecoteveterinaryhospit

al.co.uk

Gerard te Lintelo

Wear Referrals

5-11 Tenters Street

Bishop Auckland

Co. Durham, DI14 7AD

Tel: 01388 602707

Email: wear-referrals@vetsurgeon.co.uk

Robin Creighton

The Veterinary Practice

Millenium Way

Braintree

Essex, CM7 3GX

Tel: 01376 325511

Jonathan Underwood

Farnbrough Veterinary Centre

19 Farnborough Street

Farnbrough. GU14 8AG

Tel 01252 511988

Alex Gough MA VetMB CertSAM CertVC

MRCVS

Bath Veterinary Referrals

4 Beaufort East

London Road

Bath. BA1 6QD

Tel 01225 312061

Damien Bush

Director

Downs Veterinary Practice Ltd

59 Great Brockeridge

Westbury-on-Trym

Bristol. BS8 3UA

Tel 0117 962 2828

email downsvets@btconnect.com

Dr. Bernard A. Walsh, MVB, MRCVS,

CVR, DACVR

Managing Director,

Walsh Veterinary Imaging Ltd

Glenview House, Midleton, Co. Cork,

Ireland.

Tel/Fax:+353 21 463 1680

Walsh Vet MRI Ltd

2nd Floor, 26 Holmesdale Park,

Coopers Hill Road, Nutfield,

Surrey RH1 4NW, UK

Tel:+44 7906 911 848

Elsewhere -

Erik Noorman

Dierenkliniek Den Heuvel

Oirschotseweg 113 A

5684 NH Best

Tel: +31-(0)499-374205

info@dierenkliniekdenheuvel.nl

www.dierenkliniekdenheuvel.nl

Dr. Aleš Tomek, DECVN

Referral clinic “Klinika Jaggy”, s.r.o.

Komárovská 5

617 00 Brno

Czech Republic

tomek@jaggy.cz

00420 605 760 894

Dr. Sigitas Cizinauskas

The Aisti Animal Neurology Hospital

Virtatie 9, 01600 Vantaa, Finland

sigitas.cizinauskas@aisti.info

Dr. Thomas Flegel, M.S.

Diplomate ACVIM (Neurology)

Diplomate ECVN

Klinik für Kleintiere

Universität Leipzig

An den Tierkliniken 23

04103 Leipzig

Germany

Phone: 49 341 9738711

Fax: 49 341 9738799

Dr. A. J. Carter

Specialist Physician Fourways Veterinary

Hospital

Johannesburg

alaincarter@fourwaysvet.co.za

Dominic J. Marino, DVM, DACVS

Chief of Staff

Long Island Veterinary Specialists

163 South Service Road

Plainview, NY 11803

Tel: (516) 501-1700

Email: Bongorno@aol.com

Ontario Veterinary College,

University of Guelph,

50 Stone Road,

Guelph, ON, Canada,

N1G 2W1

519.824.4120 x54401

Georgina Child

Small Animal Specialist Hospital

PO Box 157, North Ryde,

Sidney NSW167

info@sashvets.com

Written by admin on April 26th, 2001